Rose Trevino Dies

By Debra Lau Whelan -- School Library Journal, 5/3/2010 2:00:00 PM

Debra begins her memorial with "Rose Zertuche-Treviño, a librarian who devoted her career to helping improve the lives of children, died on April 30 in Houston, TX. She was 58.
Treviño spent her last seven years as the youth services coordinator for the Houston Public Library, a system that serves one of the biggest Spanish-speaking populations in the country. She retired in October 2009 and moved back to San Antonio, where she was born and raised.

Rose Zertuche-Treviño

"How fitting that Rose died on April 30th, El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children's Day/ Book Day)," says her friend and colleague Oralia Garza de Cortes, a Latino children's literature consultant. "She loved her work and devoted her life to making sure all children had access to great literature and particularly to programs where children could enjoy and connect to the literature."  Read more at
YTR notes that in his time at the Houston Public Library Rose was indeed unfailingly kind and helpful.  What more could be celebrated.


Carmen Tafolla Receives Awards

(April 19, 2010)--Carmen Tafolla, visiting assistant professor in the UTSA Department of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies Mexican-American Studies' program, was awarded the 2010 Charlotte Zolotow Award for Outstanding Writing in a Picture Book and the Tomas Rivera Mexican American Children's Book Award.
The Zolotow award from the Cooperative Children's Book Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, is given annually for outstanding writing in a picture book for children in the birth through age seven range, published in the United States in the preceding year. Established in 1998, the award honors the work of Charlotte Zolotow, a distinguished children's book editor for 38 years with Harper Junior Books, and author of more than 70 picture books. The Cooperative Children's Book Center is a noncirculating library for adults with a professional, career or academic interest in children's and young adult literature.
The Tomas Rivera Mexican American Children's Book Award, established at Texas State University in 1995, encourages authors, illustrators and publishers to produce books that authentically reflect the lives of Mexican-American children and young adults in the United States."  Read more about it:

TEKS Watch

Inquiring minds may wish to follow UTEP's
"The state of Texas is currently revising its K-12 social studies Texas curriculum. The process begins with the standards--known as the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)--and will then move on to textbooks, testing, and educator certification.

TEKSWatch exists to educate citizens--in Texas and the nation--and encourage them to participate in the conversation."

Texas Wildflowers by Slight Clutter


Texas Wildflowers by slight clutter

Creative Commons, some rights reserved



Texas Wildflowers [saturated] by slight clutter.

Slight Clutter's original caption: "Took off on a hunt for wildflowers yesterday. My search took me to Brenham, Texas. This photo was taken alongside the road near an overpass.

I have to add that I suffered greatly for my "art," leaving Brenham with at least four dreadfully painful fire ant bites. Oh, but don't worry, they got there's in the end -- I promise you. mwahaahaahaahaa! "

General and Monaville, Texas - Joe Bax

Joe G. Bax  JOE BAX, rancher, lawyer, author
A few months ago I was browsing a B&N bookstore and saw an interesting book.  It was short so I picked it up and began reading its 168 pages.  Finished it before I left the store.  Reconstruction period Texas with the old man and his family patching things together until racial strife emerges. The story reveals a portion of Texas not often revealed - many in Texas besides the previous slaves really didn't like the degradation of the institution and the lingering virulence.  The story is tight and moves well.  It's good for the young reader as well as adults.  Get a copy.
Other reviews:
The General and Monaville, Texas cover

Hard Winter - Johnny Boggs

    The Western Writers of America 2010 Spur Awards include for their the Best Western Juvenile Fiction winner, Hard Winter by Johnny D. Boggs, setting begins in Texas in 1920 and ends in Montana, an oldster recalls the 1886-1887 winter with a youngster.  Publishers Weekly: "With hardly a shot fired, Spur Award-winner Boggs delivers one of his best westerns. ... Boggs has produced a tender and suspenseful western that doesn't need to rely on gun smoke."
Johnny Boggs, Western Fiction, Historical Fiction, old west, wild west